Zach Heller Marketing Week in Review

week-in-review.jpg

There exists a constant back and forth among marketers – some arguing for frequent change in campaigns, imagery, taglines, etc. and others arguing for consistency. They are both right, in some respects. And both are wrong in others. To build a brand, consistency is key, but not if whatever you are using is not working. Brands should be willing to test their way into changes that are more effective without sacrificing the core elements that make the brand, the brand.

Here are last week’s posts, in case you missed them:

  1. Ethical Questions for Marketers – Series Recap
  2. Top Conversion Rate Optimization Tips
  3. Where to Focus: Strengths or Weaknesses

Happy Saturday!

Two Ways to Boost Your Marketing Knowledge:

  1. Subscribe to the blog and never miss another marketing post
  2. Subscribe to the monthly newsletter to get a curated list of the top marketing articles from around the web

Where to Focus: Strengths or Weaknesses

askus.png

Here is a common question we ask ourselves and one another all the time:

Is it better to focus on improving our weaknesses or building on our strengths?

For many of us, the natural answer is that by focusing on our weaknesses, we might turn them into strengths. Our strengths are already things we are good at, so what use is it focusing solely on those?

But new research in a wide variety of different fields suggest that this common sense answer is wrong. It suggests that you will get more value out of focusing on your strengths in the long run.

Why is that?

  1. For most people, strengths are also things we are most interested in, meaning we have an intrinsic motivation to improve. We’re more likely to stick with exercises targeting those things we’re interested in versus things we are not.
     
  2. Your strengths are what set you apart. Improving them, will help further establish you in your field and make you more valuable, whereas working on your weaknesses might just bring you up from below average to average.
     
  3. Despite popular desire, no one can be truly good at everything. The best of us are good at a few specific things.
     
  4. Focusing on weaknesses stress us out, while focusing on strengths makes us feel prouder/happier.

All of this is not to say that you should completely ignore your weaknesses. Especially if you have major gaps in your skills or abilities that hinder your job performance. You should absolutely work to fix those. But what this does it mean is that you will get more value out of focusing on your strengths in the long run.

Top Conversion Rate Optimization Tips

5.jpg

Conversion rate optimization (CRO) is a system for increasing the percentage of visitors to a website that conversion into customers, or more generally, take any desired action. CRO has gained prevalence in recent years with the growth of popularity of “growth hacking”, as companies look to take advantage of new technologies that make online testing simple and intuitive.

If you and your company are using conversion rate optimization to improve your results, or just thinking about getting started in this area, here are my top 5 conversion rate optimization tips:

  1. Start with those tests that have the potential to have the most impact. Prioritize in terms of potential value. Much testing is about finding incremental lift, but there are likely big improvements to be found early on.
     
  2. Make sure you start by defining the metric, and make sure everyone agrees. What is a conversion? That’s what you are trying to get more of. People must agree on the goal in order to agree on the results.
     
  3. Be open to surprises. One of the biggest mistakes people make when they’re first getting started is assuming they know the results of a test before the test. Keep an open mind and let the data do the talking for you.
     
  4. Research and study what other companies/professionals have experienced in their own tests. You can find a wealth of historical data and best practices simply by spending a few hours on Google. These will give you testing ideas and open you up to new ways of creating a better user experience.
     
  5. Understand statistical significance. In simplest terms, statistical significance is the point at which we can confidently conclude that the results of a test we are running are real, and not just a coincidence.

Ethical Questions for Marketers – Series Recap

ethics.jpg

For the last twelve weeks, we’ve been running a weekly series on ethical questions that marketers and small business owners must be prepared to answer/handle/deal with in a variety of areas. Alas, that series has come to an end. We are really proud of the content it generated. So if you missed out on any of them, you can view them below:

  1. Customer Privacy Concerns
  2. Price Collusion
  3. Price Wars
  4. Spying on Competitors
  5. Pricing Consistency
  6. Targeting your Advertising
  7. Deceptive Ad Practices
  8. Selling with Sex
  9. Paying Influencers
  10. Spam
  11. Chatbots
  12. Native Advertising

Stay tuned next week, when we’ll introduce a brand new series.

Zach Heller Marketing Week in Review

week-in-review.jpg

When you have a team of people that you’re responsible for, you have to learn what motivates each one. Too many managers think they have a “cure all”, a single technique that will work to motivate everyone. Not only is that wrong, it’s dangerous. Some people respond to clear goals and constant feedback, others are better left alone. Some respond to financial incentives while others are more intrinsically motivated. When you treat everyone the same way, you hurt your team’s productivity and morale.

Here are last week’s posts, in case you missed them:

  1. Ethical Questions for Marketing – Part 12
  2. Email Marketing is About Quality, not Quantity
  3. In House vs. Agency SEO: Pros and Cons (Guest Post)

Happy Saturday!

Two Ways to Boost Your Marketing Knowledge:

  1. Subscribe to the blog and never miss another marketing post
  2. Subscribe to the monthly newsletter to get a curated list of the top marketing articles from around the web